Jihadi preacher linked to Osama bin Laden cannot be deported from UK

Defiant: British Muslims gather to worship in the street outside the Finsbury Park Mosque. The mosque was once frequented by the radical Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri, who is now serving a life sentence for terrorism charges

Defiant: British Muslims gather to worship in the street outside the Finsbury Park Mosque. The mosque was once frequented by the radical Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al-Masri, who is now serving a life sentence for terrorism charges

  • Born in Yemen, the imam regularly preaches in the north of England. 
  • He is thought to have had connections to the late Osama bin Laden. 
  • His applications for a British passport have repeatedly been turned down. 

He has repeatedly been turned down for British citizenship due to his ‘extremist’ views but now the British government is set to allow a radical Muslim preacher to stay in the UK.

The imam, who is known only in legal documents as FM, has long been considered connected to the deceased Al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden.

Born in Yemen, the 50-year-old imam regularly preaches at a well known mosque in the north of England. He cannot be named as his identity is protected by the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC).

Troubling: The radical preacher, who cannot be named, is believed to have links to the former al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden

Troubling: The radical preacher, who cannot be named, is believed to have links to the former al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden

After arriving to the UK in November 1995, the preacher had quickly applied for asylum by the end of the next month, according to the Sunday Telegraph.

Within a year of being in England, the imam, who leads prayers five times a day at a local mosque, was married and has since raised a family of five children in the UK.

The Home Office has a record of struggling to deport foreign-born extremist preachers due to Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights which protects people from likely torture and an unfair if they are originally from a troubled country.

The preacher’s lawyers insist that FM has never openly advocated violence or terrorism and that his applications for citizenship were being unfairly turned down.

The government's continual battle against radical clerics comes after it emerged this week that Anjem Choudary (pictured) has been charged with 'inviting support for ISIS'

The government’s continual battle against radical clerics comes after it emerged this week that Anjem Choudary (pictured) has been charged with ‘inviting support for ISIS’

Mizanur Rahman (pictured), also known as Abu Baraa, was also charged alongside Anjem Choudary

Mizanur Rahman (pictured), also known as Abu Baraa, was also charged alongside Anjem Choudary

If he were to be deported back to Yemen, it is possible that he might suffer torture and an unfair trial, FM has claimed.

FM’s house has previously been searched by security services and he has been stopped at several British airports whilst attempting to catch a flight out of the UK.

Despite his lawyers insisting that he is a peaceful imam, Theresa May considers the imam to be still involved in radical circles.

‘FM has been a supporter of jihad’, Mrs May said after the SIAC concluded: ‘He has openly claimed a historic association with Osama bin Laden and/or sympathy with him.’

‘The Secretary of State was, therefore, not satisfied, that on the balance of probabilities, FM was a good character’, SIAC said.

FM last passport application was blocked last year after repeatedly trying to claim asylum over the last decade in the UK.

The government’s continual battle against radical clerics comes after renowned radical cleric Anjem Choudary and one of his associates, Mizanur Rahman, was charged with’inviting support for ISIS.’

Choudary, 48, of, Ilford, east London, and Rahman, 32, of Whitechapel, have been charged with committing the alleged offence sometime between 29 June 2014 and 6 March 2015.

They have both been charged under the Terrorism Act 2000.

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