Teenage schoolboys bought bomb-making gear from the internet and discussed ‘going out with a bang’ as they plotted to blow up Parliament and Buckingham Palace

  • The 15-year-olds planned suicide bombings on public buildings, court told.
  • Purchased items including fuses and chemicals with help of online guide.
  • Skype exchanges revealed how they planned to make a beheading video.
  • Both teens, from North Tyneside, were handed 12 month detention orders.
A court heard how the teens discussed 'going out with a bang' as they plotted to blow up Parliament (pictured) and Buckingham Palace

A court heard how the teens discussed ‘going out with a bang’ as they plotted to blow up Parliament (pictured) and Buckingham Palace

Two schoolboys bought bomb-making gear from the internet and discussed ‘going out with a bang’ as they plotted to blow up Parliament and Buckingham Palace, a court heard.

The 15-year-olds, from North Tyneside, have been jailed after it was revealed they planned suicide bombings at public buildings and purchased components to build an explosive device.

Chilling Skype exchanges between the two revealed a desire to target a school and a shopping centre and their hopes to die a wanted man like killer Raoul Moat.

Two schoolboys have been jailed after buying bomb-making gear including packs of chemicals (pictured) from the internet and plotting to blow up public buildings

Two schoolboys have been jailed after buying bomb-making gear including packs of chemicals (pictured) from the internet and plotting to blow up public buildings

The 15-year-olds bought items including metal pipes as they planned attacks on a school and a randomly selected shopping centre

The 15-year-olds bought items including metal pipes as they planned attacks on a school and a randomly selected shopping centre

They boasted they wanted to go ‘out with a bang’, planned to kill families in their homes, make a beheading video and to blow up Buckingham Palace and the Houses of Parliament.

The pair referred to the death of Lee Rigby during the shocking exchanges.

The disturbed friends had bought kilos of chemicals as well as pipes and fuses off the internet and planned to build their bombs using an online guide.

At Newcastle Crown Court the pair, who both admitted conspiracy to make an explosive substance for an unlawful purpose, were each sentenced to 12 month detention and training orders.

Judge John Milford QC said the case was ‘troubling’ and added: ‘The materials had the capacity to make low explosives and from those low explosives, bombs, better described as grenades, which had the potential to cause serious injury and damage to property.

‘The potential of such items in the hands of disturbed teenagers, which you both undoubtedly were at this time, is frightening.’

The court heard the police got involved when one set of parents got suspicious about chemicals being delivered to the house late last year and contacted the police, fearing their son may be on drugs.

The sinister exchanges between the two teens were revealed when detectives investigated their internet accounts.

Prosecutor Nick Dry told the court: ‘Potential targets included a local public school, the Houses of Parliament, Buckingham Palace and a random shopping centre.

Haul: The court heard one of the boys bought the pipes and fuses while the other purchased the chemical compounds

Haul: The court heard one of the boys bought the pipes and fuses while the other purchased the chemical compounds

‘Escape plans were discussed, along with potential suicide, both said it was what they wanted for a long time and agreed to source the constituent parts of pipe bombs.’

The court heard one of the boys bought the pipes and fuses, the other the chemical compounds.

When the parents asked questions about what the boys were buying, they were fobbed off with excuses about science experiments.

The court heard when some of the chemical ingredients were intercepted and seized by one boy’s mother and father, the pair came up with alternative weapons involving bottles, nails and flame throwers.

Mr Dry added: ‘Their conversations captured revealing plans for a drug fuelled rampage, they speak of killing families in their homes, there’s reference to Lee Rigby and Raoul Moat and expressing their desire to spend their final days as a wanted man.’

One boy discussed during one exchange about making a beheading video and vowed ‘not to be taken alive’.

The court heard after the tip-off about the chemical deliveries, police went to one boy’s school to arrest him. He tried to attack the officer with a paper clip, the court heard.

Mr Dry said: ‘He produced a paperclip from his sock and repeatedly thrust it into the officer’s face.

‘During a protracted struggle, the officer used CS gas. He genuinely feared for his personal safety.’

The other boy was arrested at home.

Detectives searched the boys’ mobile phones and found disturbing links to websites about the Taliban and about making explosives, Molotov cocktails and nail bombs.

When the parents asked questions about what the boys were buying, they were fobbed off with excuses about science experiments

When the parents asked questions about what the boys were buying, they were fobbed off with excuses about science experiments

They boasted they wanted to go 'out with a bang', planned to kill families in their homes, make a beheading video and to blow up Buckingham Palace (pictured) and the Houses of Parliament

They boasted they wanted to go ‘out with a bang’, planned to kill families in their homes, make a beheading video and to blow up Buckingham Palace (pictured) and the Houses of Parliament

One boy expressed hatred of Jews and black people while the other boy had a collection of photographs of weapons including knives and a replica gun.

Army experts said the components the boys had bought were capable of making a viable bomb.

Mr Dry said: ‘If assembled correctly, it would have similar characteristics to a grenade and could have had potential to cause serious injury and damage to property ‘

The court heard one boy laughed during interrogation by detectives and said he could not remember if he was making a bomb.

The second boy said it was his friend who had homicidal tendencies and had talked about going ‘out with a bang’ at Eldon Square shopping centre in Newcastle.

Geoff Knowles, defending the boy whose parents found the materials, said he suffers from a mental health condition and was a ‘lonely young man who was clearly isolated from his peers’ and was vulnerable.

Mr Knowles added: ‘There was no physical attempt to create any device and flash powder is not lethal.

‘It’s clear he was struggling with a number of issues in his personal life at this time.’

Shaun Routledge, for the other youth, said: ‘Thanks to the actions of their parents, this offending was stopped in its tracks.

‘Since they were sending ridiculous Skype messages and talking nonsense, they have calmed down and are looking to the future.’

The defence barristers said the youths would not have been capable of actually building any bombs.

The court heard the boys, who have never been in trouble before, come from hard working families who were ‘horrified’ and that both teenagers had changed for the better since they were locked up six months ago.

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